Trisha Brown

brown-1
brown-1
brown-2
brown-2
brown-3
brown-3
brown-4
brown-4
NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Trisha Brown was born in Washington, USA on 25th November 1936 and received a B.A. degree in dance from Mills College in 1958. After graduating from Mills College in California, studying with Anna Halprin and teaching at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, Trisha Brown moved to New York City in 1961. Instantly immersed in what was to become the post-modern phenomena of Judson Dance Theatre, her movement investigations found the extraordinary in the everyday and challenged existing perceptions of what constitutes performance. In this “hot-bed of dance revolution”, Brown, along with like-minded artists, pushed the limits of choreography thereby changing modern dance forever.
In 1970, Brown formed her company and explored the terrain of New York City’s SoHo, creating her early dances for alternative spaces including rooftops and walls, and flirting with gravity alternately using it and defying it. In this time, Brown made the groundbreaking work, Man Walking Down the Side of a Building (1970), and Roof Piece (1971) among many others. Set and Reset (1983) premiered at Brooklyn Academy of Music with original music by Laurie Anderson and visual design by Robert Rauschenberg. The now iconic Set and Reset completed Brown’s first fully developed cycle of work, Unstable Molecular Structures, establishing the fluid yet unpredictably geometric style that remains a hallmark of her work.Brown collaborated for the final time with Rauschenberg to create If you couldn’t see me (1994), danced entirely with her back to the audience. One year later, this piece was transformed into a duet performed by Brown and Bill T. Jones and later Mikhail Baryshnikov.

 

With a legacy of work that shaped modern dance Brown is renowned for her choreography but many of her early works were created and performed by her self and her unique idiosyncrasies as a performer enabled her work to reach audiences through her own exploration of the body and movement.

 

Trisha Brown’s Sololos