Saturday Night Fever  
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saturdaynightfever-logo_
Finale liveshow Sunday Night Fever
Finale liveshow Sunday Night Fever
Foto: Roy Beusker
Foto: Roy Beusker
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saturdaynightfever4
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saturdaynightfever5
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Saturday Night Fever is a musical with a book by Nan Knighton (in collaboration with Arlene Phillips, Paul Nicholas, and Robert Stigwood) and music and lyrics by the Bee Gees. Directed and choreographed by Phillips, the £4 million stage adaptation premiered in the West End on 5 May 1998 at the London Palladium, and closed on 26 February 2000. Laurence Olivier Award nominations went to Garcia for Best Actor in a Musical, Phillips for Best Theatre Choreographer, and the production for Best New Musical.

Imagine it’s New York, it’s the late 70’s, you’re in a discothèque and as the heart stopping intro to one of your favourite funky hits strikes up, a man in a white suit, with beautifully angular flares and wearing a nifty pair of Cuban heels, struts his way through the crowd like a quiffed Moses parting the Red Sea of dance. This fly disco stallion then proceeds to move, twist and wiggle his way through a pantheon of classic tunes, making ladies flustered and men very, very jealous.

Saturday Night Fever focuses on Tony Manero, a Brooklyn youth whose weekend is spent at the local discotheque. There he luxuriates in the admiration of the crowd and a growing relationship with Stephanie Mangano, and can temporarily forget the realities of his life, including a dead-end job in a paint store and his gang of deadbeat friends. In an effort to make it a family-friendly show, many of the film’s darker elements, including references to racial conflict, drug use, and violence, were eliminated from the plot.